Income history – MMOG Accounts http://mmogaccounts.com/ Mon, 27 Jun 2022 02:21:22 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://mmogaccounts.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-66.png Income history – MMOG Accounts http://mmogaccounts.com/ 32 32 Biden: G-7 to ban Russian gold imports to pressure Putin on Ukraine https://mmogaccounts.com/biden-g-7-to-ban-russian-gold-imports-to-pressure-putin-on-ukraine/ Sun, 26 Jun 2022 21:40:00 +0000 https://mmogaccounts.com/biden-g-7-to-ban-russian-gold-imports-to-pressure-putin-on-ukraine/ Placeholder while loading article actions TELFS, Austria — President Biden and several of his Group of Seven counterparts announced a ban on further Russian gold imports on Sunday — and appeared to be heading for a consensus on a cap on Russian gas prices — to further isolate the country from financial markets and punish […]]]>
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TELFS, Austria — President Biden and several of his Group of Seven counterparts announced a ban on further Russian gold imports on Sunday — and appeared to be heading for a consensus on a cap on Russian gas pricesto further isolate the country from financial markets and punish President Vladimir Putin for his invasion of Ukraine.

A ban on gold imports, which could cost tens of billions of dollars in fines, has emerged as the main new economic sanction aimed at pushing Russia out of the summit. Administration officials declined to comment on whether further punitive action would be taken.

“The United States has imposed unprecedented costs on Putin to deny him the revenue he needs to fund his war on Ukraine,” Biden said. tweeted Sunday morning, noting that gold is “a major export that brings in tens of billions of dollars for Russia.”

Biden and other leaders of industrialized countries have started their meetings in southern Germany on Sunday for a summit that is expected to be dominated by discussions of the fallout from the war in Ukraine.

Biden, who arrived late Saturday evening, attended mass with a US Army priest before starting his day with a bilateral meeting with German Chancellor Olaf Scholz to discuss the war.

The two leaders had a little chat as Biden, silhouetted by the Alps, joked that he had skied a lot but hadn’t in a while. “It’s beautiful,” he remarked.

The conversation then turned more serious, with Biden thanking Scholz for Germany’s resolve and ability to keep the alliance together. “We have to stay together. Because Putin was counting from the start that NATO and the G-7 would part ways one way or another,” Biden said. “But we haven’t, and we’re not going to.”

In the afternoon, summit leaders announced a new global infrastructure investment program, with the aim of mobilizing $600 billion in public and private investment by 2027. United pledging $200 billion – would go to improving health, communications and energy. infrastructure in low- and middle-income countries. It aims to help counter ambitious global spending by China, which has invested heavily in Africa and Asia through its Belt and Road Initiative.

“Our nations and our world stand at a true inflection point in history,” Biden said.

Some of the initial plans highlighted by Biden administration officials include a $2 billion project to develop a solar panel project in southern Angola; building telecommunications cables that would link Singapore to France via Egypt and the Horn of Africa, extending high-speed internet access; and the construction of a large manufacturing plant for multiple vaccines in Senegal.

The day also included hints of disagreements between some of the top leaders, including French President Emmanuel Macron and British Prime Minister Boris Johnson.

In a statement, Downing Street said Johnson had “emphasized” to Macron that “any attempt to settle the [Ukraine] the current conflict will only cause lasting instability and will give Putin the right to manipulate both sovereign countries and international markets in perpetuity.

The remarks appeared to be a criticism of Macron’s comments in mid-June that Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky and his officials will have to negotiate with Russia at some point. Before Macron, Scholz and other European leaders traveled to the Ukrainian capital of Kyiv, the comments raised fears among Ukrainian officials that France and Germany were pushing for talks with Russia amid the economic toll of the war escalates.

Russia earned nearly $100 billion from fuel exports in first 100 days of war, report says

French officials dismissed such concerns and said it was up to Ukraine to determine when the time for talks was right. A spokesman for the French presidency said on Sunday that Macron and Johnson “had a discussion on Ukraine during which the president firmly reaffirmed his determination to support Ukraine.”

France has delivered or pledged almost a quarter of its existing stockpiles of Caesar artillery weapon systems to Ukraine, and the country’s reduced dependence on Russian fossil fuels has allowed France to become one of the first champions of a European Union embargo on Russian oil.

But Macron and Scholz have spoken to Putin several times on the phone since the invasion, drawing particular criticism in Eastern Europe.

The United States pushed for an agreement on a price cap on Russian oil imports to hurt Moscow’s ability to finance the war. G-7 leaders are heading towards a consensus on a price cap, according to a person with knowledge of Sunday’s talks who spoke on condition of anonymity to discuss the private talks.

The aim is to simultaneously cap the amount nations pay for Russian oil, hoping to hurt Moscow’s ability to finance the war, while trying to reduce inflation at the fuel pump. Soaring oil prices have hampered some of the countries’ efforts to diversify away from Russian energy, as Moscow is paid more for lower volume.

To entice other countries to participate, the leaders discussed ways to make it difficult to insure or ship Russian oil that does not meet the price cap.

At Sunday’s meeting, Macron stressed that a price cap should also cover gas. Price caps on Russian natural gas flowing through pipelines to Europe are seen as easier to enforce because the infrastructure means it cannot be sold elsewhere.

Scholz warned that an oil price cap would only be helpful if all buyers agreed. “The issues to be resolved are not trivial issues,” said a German official. “But we are on the right track to find an agreement.”

Italian Prime Minister Mario Draghi has raised concerns about the potential political ramifications of the price hike. “The energy crisis must not produce a return of populism,” he said, according to the individual with details of the discussion.

“Capping the price of fossil fuels imported from Russia has a geopolitical purpose as well as an economic and social purpose,” Draghi said. “We need to reduce our funding to Russia. And we must eliminate one of the main causes of inflation.

Biden calls for dramatic increase in aid to Ukraine

In a briefing with reporters ahead of the summit, administration officials touted the decision to ban gold imports as an important demonstration that the world’s largest economies are prepared to continue to punish Russia, one of the largest gold exporters in the world. The official announcement will take place on Tuesday, according to administration officials, and the US Treasury Department will make a formal decision to ban further gold imports.

“The United States has rallied the world by imposing rapid and significant economic costs to deprive Putin of the revenue he needs to fund his war,” one of the officials said, speaking on condition of anonymity in accordance with basic briefing rules.

The official hinted at additional steps that could be taken to further isolate Russia, but suggested these would come in the coming weeks, rather than more immediately as part of the summit.

“This is a key export, a key source of income, a key alternative for Russia, in terms of its ability to transact in the global financial system,” the official said. “Taking this action cuts off that capability and is yet another continuing illustration of the kinds of actions the G-7 can take collectively to continue to isolate Russia and cut it off from the global economy.”

One of the goals of the United States and its international partners, the official said, would be to prevent Russia – which has found ways to circumvent previous sanctions – from evading the import ban. The fact that they moved toward banning gold imports, administration officials said, was actually a sign that other ways for Russia to access global financial markets had been cut off.

Russian oligarchs, for example, have sought to buy gold bullion to avoid the financial impact of Western sanctions, and G-7 leaders hope that will send another signal to Putin’s key allies.

“The measures we announced today will directly affect the Russian oligarchs and strike at the heart of Putin’s war machine,” Johnson said as part of his own announcement regarding the ban on gold imports.

“We must deprive the Putin regime of its funding,” he added. “The UK and our allies are doing just that.”

Ashley Parker in Telfs and Annabelle Timsit in London contributed to this report.

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My 3 Best Dividend Stocks for Generating Passive Income https://mmogaccounts.com/my-3-best-dividend-stocks-for-generating-passive-income/ Sat, 25 Jun 2022 09:52:00 +0000 https://mmogaccounts.com/my-3-best-dividend-stocks-for-generating-passive-income/ Earn money while you sleep. Or while you watch your favorite show. Or while you go out with friends. Or while… you get the picture. I’m talking, of course, about generating passive income. There are many ways to generate passive income. One of the best is to buy stocks of big companies that pay attractive […]]]>

Earn money while you sleep. Or while you watch your favorite show. Or while you go out with friends. Or while… you get the picture. I’m talking, of course, about generating passive income.

There are many ways to generate passive income. One of the best is to buy stocks of big companies that pay attractive dividends. Here are my top three dividend stocks right now for generating passive income.

1. Devon Energy

Devon Energy (DVN -1.77%) offers an exorbitant dividend yield of almost 8.8%. It is more than 6 times more than the S&P500the dividend yield. Devon’s dividend is also one you can count on. The oil and gas company has paid a dividend for 29 consecutive years.

I think Devon currently ranks among the best high yielding dividend stocks in the market. Its dividend, however, is only one factor in my view. The stock also beat the broader stock market, jumping more than 30% year-to-date.

Devon also rewards shareholders through share buybacks. The company has repurchased $891 million of its stock so far in 2022. Its board recently expanded the share buyback program to $2 billion.

Of course, the current tailwinds for Devon won’t last forever. However, I think the company should continue to be a winner for investors for some time to come.

2. Enterprise Product Partners

Enterprise Product Partners (EPD 1.65%) stands out as another great source of passive income in the energy industry. The distribution yield of the midstream oil and gas company exceeds 7.6%. Enterprise has increased its distribution for 23 consecutive years.

Like Devon, Enterprise Products Partners has easily beaten major market indexes so far this year. Its shares are up nearly 20% since the start of the year.

Increased demand for crude oil and natural gas has benefited Enterprise. The company’s assets include more than 50,000 miles of pipelines and 24 natural gas processing facilities, as well as 19 deepwater docks.

But as a mid-market leader, Enterprise isn’t dependent on high fuel prices the way oil and gas producers are. The company’s business model helps ensure that the stock will hold up regardless of market conditions.

3. Medical Properties Trust

Medical Properties Trust (MPW 2.86%) increased its dividend for 10 consecutive years. The healthcare-focused real estate investment trust (REIT) is offering a dividend yield that now sits above 7.9%.

The bad news is that shares of Medical Properties Trust have not performed well in 2022. Shares are down almost 40%. But that’s not because the company’s underlying business is struggling.

Medical Properties Trust’s normalized operating funds jumped 15.6% year-over-year in the first quarter to $282 million. Net income nearly quadrupled to $632 million, driven primarily by acquisitions.

Chairman and CEO Ed Aldag said on Medical Properties Trust’s first quarter conference call in April that the company “is in the strongest position in its history.” This is not an exaggeration.

Medical Properties Trust has a healthy balance sheet which has been further strengthened by recent property divestments. It is also well positioned to weather high rates of inflation through annual cash rent increases built into its leases. Investors should easily generate significant passive income with these high yielding dividend stocks.

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Prioritize sweeping clean energy legislation – pv magazine USA https://mmogaccounts.com/prioritize-sweeping-clean-energy-legislation-pv-magazine-usa/ Thu, 23 Jun 2022 17:19:53 +0000 https://mmogaccounts.com/prioritize-sweeping-clean-energy-legislation-pv-magazine-usa/ Passing the Build Back Better climate jobs and clean energy provisions is our best chance of achieving the necessary reductions and averting climate catastrophe; we just can’t wait any longer. June 23, 2022 Kevin Johnson and Odette Mucha With each passing day, the planet is warming and the window to advance urgent climate legislation is […]]]>

Passing the Build Back Better climate jobs and clean energy provisions is our best chance of achieving the necessary reductions and averting climate catastrophe; we just can’t wait any longer.

With each passing day, the planet is warming and the window to advance urgent climate legislation is shrinking. As the United States celebrates independence in July, we can also establish ourselves as a global leader in the fight against the climate crisis – the ultimate act of patriotism and duty to country.

After more than a year of missed opportunities, this summer ushered in a watershed opportunity for the US Senate to pass the Build Back Better Act’s $555 billion climate jobs and clean energy package. passed by the House. Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer must put climate at the top of the agenda and work to pass a fiscal reconciliation package by Independence Day as Democrats hold always the majority.

The climate and jobs package would put the country on track to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to 50% below peak levels by 2030, which is about the pace that scientists say the whole world must follow to prevent the Earth from warming more than 2.7 F. Experts warn that beyond this threshold, the threat of catastrophic weather events will increase enormously.

Passing the Build Back Better climate jobs and clean energy provisions is our best chance of achieving the necessary reductions and averting climate catastrophe; we just can’t wait any longer. If Democrats lose control of Congress after midterm elections this fall, hopes for meaningful climate action at the federal level will be dashed. Conversely, if the Senate follows the House’s lead and sends this legislation to the President’s office, it would mark the largest federal investment ever in clean energy and usher in a new era for our nation’s energy system. .

Americans want to see this action. A Pew Center poll in January found that 69% of Americans favor federal action toward carbon neutrality by 2050. The climate package would have far-reaching impacts beyond reducing 5.2 billion tons of carbon. greenhouse gas emissions by 2030. It would spur inherently deflationary clean energy projects, help strengthen energy security and national security, create millions of jobs, improve community health and reduce energy expenditure of $67 billion per year, saving US households $300 per year.

The bulk of the funding – around $320 billion – would go towards providing tax credits for installing residential and commercial solar power, retrofitting buildings to be more energy efficient and the purchase of electric vehicles. These provisions alone would mark the largest climate investment in our country’s history, setting the course to achieve our goals of reducing greenhouse gas emissions while creating millions of well-paying jobs, reducing energy costs to consumers, advancing environmental justice, investing in climate-resilient housing and community infrastructure, and strengthening our economy.

As Americans face historically high prices at the gas pump, it’s also critical that we advance our nation’s energy independence and reduce our reliance on foreign oil. The Biden administration has already demonstrated its commitment to bolstering our domestic clean energy industry by invoking the Defense Production Act (DPA) to boost the manufacturing of solar technology on American soil. Build Back Better would build on that momentum, doing even more to kick-start domestic manufacturing of clean energy equipment, including wind turbines and solar panels.

The key to building back better is the protection and inclusion of low-income and historically disadvantaged communities. The bill would implement a 30% tax credit on solar project costs, plus an additional 10% to 20% tax credit for renewable energy systems located in or serving low-income communities. revenue. Basically, the solar tax credit would be made refundable or paid directly allowing everyone, including non-taxable entities like cities, nonprofits, tribes, and schools, regardless of their federal income tax, to access the tax credit. These provisions allow more Americans to experience the benefits of clean energy directly.

The overwhelming positive response to President Biden’s DPA announcement from the American people, the energy industry, environmental advocates, business leaders and the stock market last week clearly indicates that the future is in clean energy. If Majority Leader Schumer can pass this transformative legislation by July 4, he will secure his place in history at this pivotal moment for the United States of America. It’s the patriotic thing to do.

U.S. Army veteran Kevin Johnson is co-founder of CleanCapital, board director of the Environmental Defense Action Fund and American Resilience Project .

Odette Mucha is Federal Liaison Officer at Vote Solar and former White House and US Department of Energy analyst.

The views and opinions expressed in this article are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of photo magazine.

This content is copyrighted and may not be reused. If you wish to cooperate with us and wish to reuse some of our content, please contact: editors@pv-magazine.com.

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Australia’s central bank has been targeting real wage cuts for years https://mmogaccounts.com/australias-central-bank-has-been-targeting-real-wage-cuts-for-years/ Wed, 22 Jun 2022 03:46:05 +0000 https://mmogaccounts.com/australias-central-bank-has-been-targeting-real-wage-cuts-for-years/ Reserve Bank of Australia Governor Philip Lowe has made it clear that the central bank’s overriding objective is to inflict a real wage cut on workers, currently struggling with rising inflation, for the “years” to come. come. Reserve Bank of Australia Governor Philip Lowe interviewed on ABC-TV (Image: YouTube ABC News “7.30”) In an address […]]]>

Reserve Bank of Australia Governor Philip Lowe has made it clear that the central bank’s overriding objective is to inflict a real wage cut on workers, currently struggling with rising inflation, for the “years” to come. come.

Reserve Bank of Australia Governor Philip Lowe interviewed on ABC-TV (Image: YouTube ABC News “7.30”)

In an address on monetary policy at the American Chamber of Commerce in Sydney yesterday, Lowe said an annual wage increase of no more than 3.5% was a good “anchor point” for unions and employers. This is under conditions where the RBA has forecast the inflation rate to reach 7% by the end of the year, up from its current level of 5.1%.

In his speech, he said as the bank worked to bring inflation back to its target range of 2-3%, “Australians should be prepared for further interest rate hikes.” How far they should go would be determined by assessing the outlook for inflation and the labor market.

He gave more details in response to questions, saying the inflation rate would stay above target for “years” and the bank would do “whatever it takes” to bring it down. If wage increases become common in the 4-5% range, well below the bank’s inflation forecast, then “it will be much more difficult to bring inflation down to 2.5%.

“Three and a half is the anchor that I want people to keep in mind. I know it’s tough when inflation is higher than that,” he said.

“In the 1970s, we got into trouble because wage growth mechanically responded to rising inflation. We had higher inflation, wages reacted, then it becomes persistent. »

If a similar result occurs in the coming months, the bank would have to react with higher interest rates, which could lead to an economic slowdown. “Hopefully we can avoid that.”

In other words, workers are being told that unless they tolerate pay cuts for “years”, as the bank’s own projections clearly show, it will push the economy into recession, making raise unemployment to enforce the demands of finance capital.

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Dartmouth eliminates student loans for undergraduates https://mmogaccounts.com/dartmouth-eliminates-student-loans-for-undergraduates/ Mon, 20 Jun 2022 05:16:27 +0000 https://mmogaccounts.com/dartmouth-eliminates-student-loans-for-undergraduates/ Donating financial aid through The Call to Lead campaign has reinforced Dartmouth’s commitment to making a college education accessible and affordable to the most promising and talented students around the world and from all economic backgrounds. “Thanks to this extraordinary investment from our community, students can prepare for lives of impact with fewer constraints,” says […]]]>

Donating financial aid through The Call to Lead campaign has reinforced Dartmouth’s commitment to making a college education accessible and affordable to the most promising and talented students around the world and from all economic backgrounds.

“Thanks to this extraordinary investment from our community, students can prepare for lives of impact with fewer constraints,” says President Hanlon. “Eliminating loans from financial aid programs will allow Dartmouth undergraduates to pursue their purpose and passion in the widest possible range of career opportunities.”

Two recent donations capped efforts to eliminate student debt through the campaign. In May, Anne Kubik ’87, a member of the President’s Commission on Financial Aid and an early supporter of the initiative, added $10 million to an earlier pledge to bring the effort closer to reality. An anonymous donor then committed $25 million to complete the campaign, establishing one of the largest scholarship endowments in Dartmouth history.

“Our gratitude for these extraordinary acts of generosity knows no bounds,” said President Hanlon.

“Both donors have told me of their enthusiasm for ensuring that more applicants can pursue an education at Dartmouth without worrying about their financial means.”

– President Philip J. Hanlon ’77

Currently, Dartmouth undergraduates from families with an annual income of $125,000 or less who have typical assets are offered need-based aid with no loan component required. Dartmouth now waives the loan requirement for undergraduate students from families with annual incomes over $125,000 who receive need-based financial aid. This will reduce the debt burden of hundreds of middle-income Dartmouth students and their families by an average of $22,000 over four years. This will in turn open up opportunities for recent graduates to consider career opportunities or higher degrees that they might not otherwise have been able to pursue.

More than 65 families have supported the campaign’s goal of eliminating loan requirements from Dartmouth’s undergraduate financial aid scholarships, committing more than $80 million in donations to the endowment.

“This gift honors Dartmouth’s tradition of service,” says Kubik.

“Over the years, I’ve been fortunate to serve alongside alumni who dedicate hundreds of hours to making Dartmouth stronger for future students. The presidential commission embodied the best of this altruism of the elders. Dartmouth is more welcoming than ever because of it.

-Anne Kubik ’87

Successful applicants to the Class of 2027 will be the first undergraduate students to enroll through this historic investment in Dartmouth’s endowment.

Over the past week, members of the Dartmouth community have rallied to pledge an additional $5 million to eliminate required loans in financial aid scholarships for all current AB students, many of whom have seen their university experience disrupted by the global pandemic. President Hanlon thanked several families for their commitment to extending the no-loan policy to current students: Dana Banga and Angad Banga ’06; Leslie Davis Dahl ’85 and Robert Dahl; Katherine Dunleavy and Keith Dunleavy ’91; Karen Frank and James Frank ’65 (in honor of Peggy Epstein Tanner ’79); Julie McColl-McKenna ’89 and David McKenna ’89; Hadley Mullin ’96 and Daniel Kalafatas ’96; Robin Bryson Reynolds ’91 and Jake Reynolds ’90; and Victoria Ershova and Mike Triplett ’96.

“Dartmouth’s commitment to meeting 100% of demonstrated need for all students is longstanding and a source of pride,” says Lee Coffin, Vice Provost, Admissions and Dean of Admissions and Financial Aid. “These new policies reinforce this deep and enduring commitment to full and equal access to an education in Dartmouth. Expanding scholarships by removing loans from all aid programs further levels the playing field as we invite students from all socio-economic backgrounds to join the Dartmouth community.

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Sexual dysfunction more common in rheumatoid arthritis and psoriatic arthritis https://mmogaccounts.com/sexual-dysfunction-more-common-in-rheumatoid-arthritis-and-psoriatic-arthritis/ Thu, 16 Jun 2022 14:04:17 +0000 https://mmogaccounts.com/sexual-dysfunction-more-common-in-rheumatoid-arthritis-and-psoriatic-arthritis/ Data from a cross-sectional observational study of patients in rheumatology outpatient clinics in two academic health systems provide insight into the prevalence of sexual dysfunction in patients with rheumatic diseases. Presented at the annual European Congress of Rheumatology (EULAR 2022), the results of the study, which assessed sexual dysfunction using a 14-item version of the […]]]>

Data from a cross-sectional observational study of patients in rheumatology outpatient clinics in two academic health systems provide insight into the prevalence of sexual dysfunction in patients with rheumatic diseases.

Presented at the annual European Congress of Rheumatology (EULAR 2022), the results of the study, which assessed sexual dysfunction using a 14-item version of the Changes in Sexual Functioning Questionnaire (CSFQ-14), suggest that sexual dysfunction was prevalent in 48% of patients with rheumatoid arthritis, 30% of patients with psoriatic arthritis, and only 6% of those without rheumatic disease in the study control group.

“Both chronic inflammatory joint diseases have a deteriorated sex life compared to a healthy population. All areas of the sexual sphere were functionally impaired,” said lead researcher Carlos Valera-Ribera, from Doctor Peset University Hospital in València, Spain, during his presentation at EULAR 2022.

Although previous studies have examined the prevalence of sexual dysfunction in patients with rheumatic diseases, Valera-Ribera and colleagues noted that most of these studies were limited by design, including the lack of a population healthy control for comparison. With this in mind, the researchers sought to describe the prevalence of sexual dysfunction in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and psoriatic arthritis and compare these results to a healthy population of patients from the same region.

Using patients from a pair of outpatient facilities at a university hospital, investigators identified 188 patients to include in their analyses. Of the 188 patients identified for inclusion, 89 were healthy controls, 72 were diagnosed with psoriatic arthritis according to CASPAR criteria, and 27 were diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis according to EULAR/ACR 2010 criteria. The investigators pointed out that 30.43% of people with psoriatic arthritis, 48.15% of those with rheumatoid arthritis, and 5.88% of the control group had scores in the sexual dysfunction range on the CSFQ-14.

The overall study cohort was composed of 52.7% women, 47.3% men and had a mean age of 48 ± 12.5 years. When examining participant characteristics, Valera-Ribera pointed out that more than half of the study population rated their own health as “good” or “very good” and 77.7% had a personal history of depression, 18.6% requiring psychological treatment and 18.1% receiving pharmacological treatment. For analysis, the investigators collected information on several variables to include in their regression models, including age, gender, year of diagnosis, perceived health, marital status, education, employment status, annual income level, history of depression. , and the active treatment of mental illnesses.

After analysis, investigators found that sexual dysfunction was associated with a diagnosis of psoriatic arthritis and rheumatoid arthritis (P <.001), age (P <.001), employment status (P <.001), and the annual income level (P=.002). When assessing CSFQ-14 scores, the results suggested that men had an average score 7.5 points higher than women, but this score decreased to 6.15 in men with psoriatic arthritis. Further analysis suggested with psoriatic arthritis and rheumatoid arthritis had an average score 8.2 points lower than their counterparts in the healthy control groups.

Additionally, the results indicated that all domains of the CSFQ-14 questionnaire were negatively affected by psoriatic arthritis or rheumatoid arthritis (P <.001). When assessing the odds ratio of sexual dysfunction, the observed results suggest that patients diagnosed with psoriatic arthritis have an 8.7 times higher risk of having sexual dysfunction than those with a diagnosis of polyarthritis rheumatoid patients have a 10 times higher risk of having sexual dysfunction when compared to healthy controls.

“Age, gender, perceived health, employment status and economic status are linked to the risk of suffering from sexual dysfunction and should be taken into account in daily practice when assessing this aspect of our patient,” added Valera-Ribera.

References:

1. Vilera-Ribera C. Annual European Congress of Rheumatology (EULAR 2022). IMPACT OF CHRONIC JOINT DISEASES ON THE SEXUAL SPHERE IN RELATION TO A HEALTHY POPULATION: A MULTICENTRIC STUDY.

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LePage, Poliquin pack groceries to highlight inflation as Democrats hit back at taxes https://mmogaccounts.com/lepage-poliquin-pack-groceries-to-highlight-inflation-as-democrats-hit-back-at-taxes/ Sun, 12 Jun 2022 03:03:00 +0000 https://mmogaccounts.com/lepage-poliquin-pack-groceries-to-highlight-inflation-as-democrats-hit-back-at-taxes/ Former Governor Paul LePage and former 2nd District Rep. Bruce Poliquin shopped at Gowell’s Shop and Save in Greene on Saturday to highlight inflation and rising costs in Maine. Both LePage and Poliquin are seeking to return to their seats in 2022. LePage is running unopposed in Tuesday’s GOP gubernatorial primary and is expected to […]]]>

Former Governor Paul LePage and former 2nd District Rep. Bruce Poliquin shopped at Gowell’s Shop and Save in Greene on Saturday to highlight inflation and rising costs in Maine. Both LePage and Poliquin are seeking to return to their seats in 2022. LePage is running unopposed in Tuesday’s GOP gubernatorial primary and is expected to face Gov. Janet Mills in the November general election. Poliquin takes on Liz Caruso in a GOP primary on Tuesday, where the winner will face 2nd District Rep. Jared Golden in November. the third highest in the nation, and nothing has been done in Augusta,” LePage said, citing data from the Economic Policy InstituteAccording to data from the Congressional Joint Economic Committee, Maine’s inflation rate since the start of 2021 is currently tied for the fourth lowest in the country. LePage says he would help cut costs by eliminating taxes on trucks delivering goods to Maine as well as state income tax, a position he has long championed. He says he would make up for lost revenue through creative measures. “There are other forms of income you can generate,” LePage said. “You can make $100 million in sports betting if you do it right. When I became governor in 2011 we were making $10 million a year from liquor sales and when I left we were making $57 million a year. dollars on liquor sales. So there are other ways to do it.” Mills signed into law the sports betting legislation last month. She and Maine Democrats criticized LePage for raising the sales tax of the state during his tenure and for opposing policies they believe would have helped reduce costs for Maine residents.” If Paul LePage really cared about costs for Maine families, he wouldn’t would not have increased sales. taxes or helped raise property taxes while in office,” the Maine Democratic Party said in a statement. “Nor would he have blocked access to affordable health care, impeded affordable housing for seniors, or cut funding for child care – all moves that have increased costs for the people of Maine again and again.” LePage did not rule out increasing the sales tax or raising taxes on seasonal residents to help find additional revenue. “Everything would be on the table,” LePage said. “I don’t think you necessarily need to raise a tax, we should look at it. But in 2011, we lowered income tax from 8.5% to 7.15%. In 2012, we had the best revenue year in the state of Maine. “Numbers refer to the top rate in Maine’s tax bracket, which was lowered in 2015. LePage also criticized Mills for not doing enough to deal with rising fuel prices in Maine. costs, which hit a state average of $5.07 a gallon on Saturday.”The governor can do little things to reduce the fuel tax,” LePage said. “Like, for example, you could get 31 cents off gasoline right now.” The 31 cents refers to the state’s current gasoline tax, which is 30 cents for regular fuel and 31 for diesel. LePage referred to Mills’ divestment of public funds from fossil fuels as another example of a way to lower gasoline prices, a process that began this week.” While Governor Mills can’t control the global trend of pandemic-induced inflation, she worked with Democrats, R Republicans and Independents in the Legislature to send $850 relief checks to the Mainers — a plan LePage went against his own party to oppose,” the party statement read. “It’s the strong, stable leadership the Mainers want in their governor.” While checks were originally a Republican idea, LePage says the money should have been used to subsidize fuel oil instead of going directly to people. heat their homes this winter,” LePage said. “I’m telling you, this winter Maine is going to have a crisis.” Former U.S. Representative Bruce Poliquin says he believes Mainers are tired of high costs and have “I’m really worried about our seniors on fixed incomes and our young families with a bunch of kids, how are they going to pay for all of this,” Poliquin said. “It’s not necessary.” Poliquin faces to Liz Caruso in Tuesday’s GOP primary for the 2nd congressional district. Caruso attacked Poliquin for being out of touch with Maine voters, but Poliquin says Caruso isn’t used to delivering for people in the district.” I have a record,” Poliquin said. “My record is a real record of securing the border. I also have a real track record to make sure we were energy independent. I was approved by the NRA. I am used to defending life and religious freedoms. My opponent has no case.

Former Governor Paul LePage and former 2nd District Rep. Bruce Poliquin shopped at Gowell’s Shop and Save in Greene on Saturday to highlight inflation and rising costs in Maine.

LePage and Poliquin are both seeking to regain their seats in 2022. LePage is running unopposed in Tuesday’s GOP gubernatorial primary and is expected to face Gov. Janet Mills in the November general election. Poliquin takes on Liz Caruso in a GOP primary on Tuesday, where the winner will face 2nd District Rep. Jared Golden in November.

LePage has attempted to highlight the rising cost of food which he claims is the result of the policies of the Mills administration.

“The cost of food in Maine is the third highest in the country, and nothing has been done in Augusta,” LePage said, citing data from the Economic Policy Institute.

According to data from the Congressional Joint Economic Committee, Maine’s inflation rate since the start of 2021 is currently tied for the fourth-lowest in the nation.

LePage says he would help cut costs by eliminating taxes on trucks delivering goods to Maine as well as state income tax, a position he has long championed. He says he would make up for lost revenue with creative measures.

“There are other forms of income you can bring in,” LePage said. “You can make $100 million in sports betting if you do it right. When I became governor in 2011 we were making $10 million a year from liquor sales and when I left we were making $57 million a year. dollars on alcohol sales, so there are other ways to do it.

Mills signed into law the sports betting legislation last month. She and Maine Democrats have criticized LePage for raising the state sales tax during his tenure and for opposing policies they say would have helped lower costs for Mainers.

“If Paul LePage really cared about the costs to Maine families, he wouldn’t have raised sales taxes or helped raise property taxes when he was in office,” the Maine Democratic Party said in a statement. . “Nor would he have blocked access to affordable health care, impeded affordable housing for seniors, or cut funding for child care – all moves that have increased costs for the people of Maine again and again.”

LePage hasn’t ruled out raising sales tax or raising taxes on seasonal residents to help find additional revenue.

“Everything would be on the table,” LePage said. “I don’t think you necessarily need to raise a tax, we should look at it. But in 2011, we lowered income tax from 8.5% to 7.15%. 2012 was the best revenue year in the state of Maine. »

Numbers refer to the top rate of Maine’s tax bracket, which was lowered in 2015.

LePage also criticized Mills for not doing enough to deal with rising fuel costs in Maine, which averaged $5.07 a gallon on Saturday.

“The governor can do little things to lower the fuel tax,” LePage said. “Like for example, you could get 31 cents worth of gas right now.”

The 31 cents refers to the current state gasoline tax, which is 30 cents for regular fuel and 31 for diesel. LePage cited Mills’ divestment of public funds from fossil fuels as another example of how to lower gasoline prices.

The Maine Democratic Party responded by touting Mills’ efforts to relieve Mainers by using half of the state’s budget surplus to send $850 checks to Maine taxpayers, a process that began this week.

“While Governor Mills cannot control the global trend of pandemic-induced inflation, she has worked with Democrats, Republicans and Independents in the Legislature to send $850 relief checks to Mainers – a plan that LePage opposed against his own party,” the party said. “It’s the strong, stable leadership the Mainers want in their governor.”

While checks were originally a Republican idea, LePage says the money should have been used to subsidize fuel oil instead of going directly to people.

“I would have taken a really big chunk of that money and put it in an account to help homeowners heat their homes this winter,” LePage said. “I’m telling you, this winter Maine is going to have a crisis.”

Former U.S. Representative Bruce Poliquin says he believes the Mainers are tired of high costs and eager for change.

“I’m really worried for our seniors on fixed incomes and our young families with a bunch of kids, how are they going to pay for all of this,” Poliquin said. “It’s not necessary.”

Poliquin faces Liz Caruso in Tuesday’s GOP primary for the 2nd congressional district. Caruso attacked Poliquin for being out of touch with Maine voters, but Poliquin says Caruso isn’t used to delivering for district residents.

“I have a record,” Poliquin said. “My assessment is a real assessment of border security. I also have a real track record to make sure we were energy independent. I was approved by the NRA. I am used to defending life and religious freedoms. My opponent has no case.

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AAPL dividend announcement $0.0790/share 06/09/2022 https://mmogaccounts.com/aapl-dividend-announcement-0-0790-share-06-09-2022/ Fri, 10 Jun 2022 00:24:12 +0000 https://mmogaccounts.com/aapl-dividend-announcement-0-0790-share-06-09-2022/ Com Shs Of Ben Int/Blackstone Long-Short Credit Income Fund (NYSE:BGX) declared on 09/06/2022 a dividend of $0.0790 per share payable June 30, 2022 to shareholders of record as of June 23, 2022. Dividend amount recorded is an increase of $0.006 over the last dividend paid. Com Shs Of Ben Int/Blackstone Long-Short Credit Income Fund (NYSE:BGX) […]]]>

Com Shs Of Ben Int/Blackstone Long-Short Credit Income Fund (NYSE:BGX) declared on 09/06/2022 a dividend of $0.0790 per share payable June 30, 2022 to shareholders of record as of June 23, 2022. Dividend amount recorded is an increase of $0.006 over the last dividend paid.

Com Shs Of Ben Int/Blackstone Long-Short Credit Income Fund (NYSE:BGX) has paid dividends since 2011, has a current dividend yield of 7.6797385216% and has increased dividends for 0 consecutive years.

The stock price closed yesterday at $12.24 and has a 52-week low/high of $11.93 and $15.59.

The Blackstone Long-Short Credit Income Fund is registered as a diversified closed-end investment company. The primary investment objective of the Fund is to provide current income, with a secondary objective of capital appreciation.

For more information on Com Shs Of Ben Int/Blackstone Long-Short Credit Income Fund, click here.

Current dividend information for Com Shs Of Ben Int/Blackstone Long-Short Credit Income Fund as of the date of this press release is:

Dividend declaration date: June 9, 2022
Ex-dividend date: June 22, 2022
Dividend record date: June 23, 2022
Dividend payment date: June 30, 2022
Dividend amount: $0.0790

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A British businesswoman and updates on income, career and more from reality TV! https://mmogaccounts.com/a-british-businesswoman-and-updates-on-income-career-and-more-from-reality-tv/ Wed, 08 Jun 2022 06:12:25 +0000 https://mmogaccounts.com/a-british-businesswoman-and-updates-on-income-career-and-more-from-reality-tv/ Caroline Stanbury has a net worth of $30 million dollars. She is a British businesswoman and reality TV celebrity. Caroline is well known for her roles in reality TV shows such as ‘Ladies of London’ and ‘The Real Housewives of Dubai’. Net value : $30 million Date of Birth: April 28, 1976 (46 years old) […]]]>

Caroline Stanbury has a net worth of $30 million dollars. She is a British businesswoman and reality TV celebrity. Caroline is well known for her roles in reality TV shows such as ‘Ladies of London’ and ‘The Real Housewives of Dubai’.

Net value : $30 million
Date of Birth: April 28, 1976 (46 years old)
Genre: Female
Occupation: Personal stylist, entrepreneur
Nationality: England

Early life

Caroline Alice Stanbury was born on April 28, 1976 in London, England. She is the daughter of Anthony Stanbury, a venture capitalist and former chief executive of Jaeger (a high-end fashion company), and Elizabeth Stanbury, owner of a cashmere knitting business.

Elizabeth is also a member of the Vestey earthling family and an old friend of Sue Ferguson, the second wife of the Duchess of York’s father. Caroline has two brothers, Alex and Edward, and a sister, Victoria.

She attended the prestigious and expensive Westonbirt School in Gloucestershire and went on to work in public relations, personal styling and the luxury goods sector immediately after.

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Career

Caroline then worked as a personal stylist for celebrities around the world. In 2008, she founded her own luxury goods company, Gift Library, which immediately became a favorite of celebrities and socialites.

Unfortunately, the shop had to close in 2015. She started working for The Wedding Shop in London in 2013. She started a new business in January 2017, a collection of furniture for her own brand, we learned.

With the help of ECmyLIFE, she designed the furniture. Stanbury is set to join the cast of Bravo’s ‘The Real Housewives of Dubai’, the first foreign installment in the series, which is slated to premiere in 2022.

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London ladies

Caroline Stanbury net worth

She was one of the stars of the Bravo Ladies of London reality show, which followed six high-profile London ladies. It was established in June 2014 and has been dubbed the “Real Housewives” of the UK. In March 2015, Bravo renewed “Ladies” for a second season, which premiered in September 2015.

In April 2016, the show was renewed for a third season. The show’s cancellation was confirmed in May 2017. Caroline’s brother Alex’s spiral marriage to Caroline’s closest friend Sophie was one of the show’s many dramatic arcs.

Caroline and Sophie’s friendship fell apart after Sophie joined the program’s third season. Alex and Sophie divorced in 2016, and Caroline and Sophie’s friendship fell apart after Sophie joined the show’s third season.

Read also : Jordan Belfort Net Worth: How Wealthy Is This Person In 2022!

Private life

She was married to wealthy investment banker Ceb Habib from 2004 to 2019, and the couple had three children: Yasmine Habib, Aaron Habib and Zac Habib. The couple continue to co-parent and enjoy a good relationship.

Her family has a long history of relationships with royalty and celebrities, and she is said to have dated everyone from Hugh Grant to Sylvester Stallone to Prince Andrew.

Sergio Carrillo, a retired professional footballer, proposed to her in 2021. On December 18, 2021, the couple married in a grand ceremony in Dubai, where they live.

For more entertainment information updates, please visit landscapeinsight.com

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Economic recession fears may be overblown https://mmogaccounts.com/economic-recession-fears-may-be-overblown/ Sat, 04 Jun 2022 13:00:00 +0000 https://mmogaccounts.com/economic-recession-fears-may-be-overblown/ Placeholder while loading article actions If a recession is brewing in the United States, that would be news for Doug Johnson. President of Marion Manufacturing Co. in Cheshire, Conn., Johnson is enjoying some of the best times in his company’s 76-year history. Sure, he’s heard the negative chatter about rising prices, falling inventories and growing […]]]>
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If a recession is brewing in the United States, that would be news for Doug Johnson.

President of Marion Manufacturing Co. in Cheshire, Conn., Johnson is enjoying some of the best times in his company’s 76-year history. Sure, he’s heard the negative chatter about rising prices, falling inventories and growing risks from problems overseas. And he’s seen the polls showing that most Americans think the economy is headed for a downfall.

But as Johnson surveys his 30,000 square foot operation, all he sees are busy workers rushing to fill new orders for a variety of vital steel and copper components, including those used in electrocardiograms and cable TV hookups. His biggest problem is finding enough manpower to handle all the metal bending jobs that come his way.

“There’s so much pent-up demand, and everyone I talk to — our suppliers and our customers — is saying the same thing,” he said. “We’re up 40% from last year and we’re climbing. This month we have increased by 100% compared to last year. It’s incredible.”

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Johnson’s optimistic outlook contrasts sharply with the growing gloom of high-profile figures. On Wednesday, Jamie Dimon, chief executive of JPMorganChase, warned that “a hurricane” is hitting the US economy.

Tesla chief Elon Musk and Lawrence Summers, a former Treasury secretary, also warned of an impending recession. At a college in Quinnipiac According to a poll last month, 85% of Americans agreed that a downturn was “very” or “somewhat likely” next year.

On June 3, President Biden commented on the May jobs report while acknowledging that “many Americans remain worried” about inflation. (Video: The Washington Post)

Still, Marion Manufacturing’s good fortune — reflected by continued strength in consumer spending and signals from Wall Street — suggests such dire assessments could be wrong. On Friday, the Labor Department said the economy gained 390,000 jobs in May, beating analysts’ expectations, while the jobless rate remained at 3.6%.

“I don’t know what’s driving all the talk about the recession,” Johnson said. “There’s a lot of negativity out there that isn’t well-founded.”

The Federal Reserve’s recent shift in monetary policy is the main source of recession fears. After repeatedly assuring investors last year that inflation would prove “transient,” Fed Chairman Jerome H. Powell this year steered the central bank on a path of higher rates. interest rates designed to slow the economy and ease pressure on consumer prices.

The Fed’s about-face has already been bad news for financial markets. Rising interest rates near zero prompted investors to rethink their portfolios, sending stocks tumbling and cementing the idea that something in the economy has gone seriously wrong.

But recent indicators suggest the two-year expansion – while slowing from an unsustainable annual growth rate of nearly 7% at the end of last year – shows few signs of receding. The labor market produces “help wanted” signs faster than employers can add workers. Consumers and businesses are teeming with money. And by some metrics, the bond market seems less concerned about inflation than many pundits.

“After a rocket rebound from the pandemic, there must be some moderation in growth,” said Ian Shepherdson, chief economist for Pantheon Macroeconomics. “But there is an important distinction between moderation and recession.”

Economists describe recessions as a general decline in activity affecting production, incomes, industrial production and retail sales. The term is generally understood to imply two consecutive quarters with a decline in gross domestic product, although there is no official definition.

Despite Americans’ bitter mood, economists polled by Bloomberg in May expect the economy to grow at an annual rate of 2.7% this year. That’s down from the 3.3% forecast in April, but far from a recession.

In April, layoffs hit their lowest level since the Labor Department began tracking in 1999. The economy has added an average of 408,000 jobs in each of the past three months. And first-time jobless claims, although up from an all-time low in March, are about half their average over the past 50 years.

Continued economic strength is a double-edged sword. That means more people who want work are likely to find it. But it increases the odds that the Fed, which has already hiked rates twice and signaled plans for two more half-point hikes, will do too much and trigger a recession.

Summers, a Democrat who has been critical of the Fed, said at a Washington Post Live event this week that rates needed to rise faster and higher than central bank plans. Inflation will not be brought under control without “higher unemployment”, he said.

Dean Baker, senior economist at the Center for Economic and Policy Research, said the Fed’s initial rate hikes were working. The financial markets’ response to the Fed’s actions further tightens financial conditions and could reduce the need for further rate hikes.

“I’m usually not the big optimist,” Baker said. “But things are generally going in the right direction. I don’t see the basis for a recession.

Even before the Fed began raising rates in March, financial conditions were tightening. First, banks started charging more for mortgages. On Thursday, the rate on a 30-year conventional home loan was 5.39%, up more than two percentage points since January, according to Bankrate.

Then, stocks stumbled. The tech-heavy Nasdaq index is down more than 20% this year, which could help slow the economy as suppressed investors cut spending.

At least for now, investors also seem to be siding with the Fed over the summers. Wall Street expects annual inflation of 2.76% over the next 10 years, up from more than 3% at the end of April, according to a popular market indicator derived from 10-year US Treasury yields.

This is a signal that investors believe the Fed will suppress inflation before expectations of future price increases turn into a self-fulfilling prophecy. The central bank’s favorite measure of inflation, the core personal consumption expenditure price index, has also fallen for two consecutive months.

“The path can be narrow. But we think the Fed can still thread that needle to a soft landing,” said Michael Pond, global head of inflation research at Barclays.

Americans are less optimistic. The University of Michigan’s monthly consumer confidence reading for May is at its lowest level in 11 years.

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It’s not hard to see why consumers are upset. The retail price of gasoline appears to be heading towards $5 per gallon. Ongoing supply chain headaches have left buyers facing a series of product shortages, including for critical items such as infant formula. And even where wages are rising, they are not keeping pace with prices.

The economy also faces an unusually complex combination of risks.

The war in Ukraine has pushed up the price of key global commodities, including wheat and oil, and increased the risk of recession in Europe. Meanwhile, China’s inflexible zero covid policy has triggered repeated shutdowns that have disrupted factories in the world’s top exporting nation and left global supply chains in limbo.

These geopolitical forces are immune to an increase in interest rates, which could put the Fed in a difficult situation if inflation remains high even after a significant increase in borrowing costs.

Further shocks from the European war or troubled Asian production networks could also drag the United States into a slump.

But even as polls show consumers and executives worried about the recession, they are spending as if expecting the good times to last. In late May, Macy’s raised its profit forecast after announcing that net profit in its latest quarter nearly tripled from the same period last year.

Although Americans have started to dip into their savings to support their spending, they still have over $2 trillion in reserve. That should put a floor under growth, economists said.

“Fears of a decline in economic activity this year will prove to be overblown unless further negative shocks materialize,” Goldman Sachs economists concluded in a May 30 client note.

At DHL’s North American supply chain unit, CEO Scott Sureddin said he saw no signs of slowing down. The company added new warehouses and bypassed the tight labor market by filling them with autonomous forklifts and smaller robots that grab packages. This year, he will spend hundreds of millions of dollars on such efforts.

“We are still seeing good growth. We continue to make major investments in technology,” he said. “There is nothing slowing down that makes us stop investing.”

Indeed, the financial imbalances that often precede a recession are absent. On the eve of the Great Recession of 2008, for example, consumers were struggling to pay their bills, spending the largest share of their income in history on their monthly loan and credit card fees. Today, Americans’ debt service payments consume just 9.3% of disposable income, near a 41-year low, according to the Federal Reserve.

The corporate debt burden is also remarkably light. Twenty years ago, interest payments consumed almost 25% of the cash flow of non-financial companies, according to Moody’s. Today, the figure is less than 10%.

At Marion Manufacturing, Johnson is spending several hundred thousand dollars this year on new plant equipment to process stainless steel and beryllium copper into a variety of industrial parts. He sees no reason to reconsider these plans.

“Our business as a whole has never been stronger than it is today,” Johnson said. “We are quite optimistic.”

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